These aren't foolish games: Singer Jewel appears to be dating football player Charlie Whitehurst.News of the coupling came via "Entertainment Tonight's" Nancy O'Dell, who outed the "You Were Meant For Me" singer, 41, and Whitehurst, an Indianapolis Colts backup quarterback, 33, on social media on Monday."Love running in to my pal @jewel on the field.Moreover, due to lower counting statistics, precision is usually much lower with the gas ion source than with the graphite target (2% vs.

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@clemsontigers @clemsonuniversity @clemsonalumni #jewel #followme #collegefootball #collegefootballplayoff #gotigers #byog #football #nancyodell #goodfriends #clemson #clemsongirl #clemsonfootball #nationalchampionship A photo posted by Nancy O' Dell (@nancyodell) on The "Foolish Games" singer joined O'Dell and Whitehurst, who showed their support for their alma mater Clemson, at the College Football Playoff National Championship in Glendale, Arizona.

See the most-read stories in Entertainment this hour Jewel, full name Jewel Kilcher, also shared two pics of the athlete on Instagram, one was a more subtle snapshot of Whitehurst from behind on Monday that she captioned: "Here in Phoenix for the National Championship #gotigers"The new romance comes about a year and a half after the Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter announced her "tender undoing" from her husband of six years, professional bull rider Ty Murray, with whom she shares a 4-year-old son named Kase.

They can be run in triplicates in order to improve the precision, but this requires the initial sample size to be increased, thus decreasing the interest of the gas ion source for archaeological samples.

Here, we present the first radiocarbon dates obtained from minute amounts of bone (3–60 mg) using ECHo MICADAS, the compact AMS recently installed at Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

Hard tissues contain an organic phase (mainly the protein collagen type I) embedded in a mineral phase (made of a non-stoichiometric biogenic apatite).

While the exchange of inorganic carbon occurs much more readily, the relative chemical inertness of biopolymers makes them ideal for dating; therefore, the majority of bone radiocarbon dates are obtained from the collagen phase.

In both studies, the bones were Late Pleistocene to Holocene in age, and weights were comprised of between 30–60 mg. However, ultrafiltration is often associated with lower extraction yields (especially when bones are moderately to poorly preserved), and does not always allow for the recovery of a sufficient amount of collagen when sample mass is lower than 100 mg. In general, the solution consists in dating a “reliably associated” artefact (often charcoal) from the same stratigraphic unit instead of the bone remains.

The main consensus in the radiocarbon community is that bones with less than a 1% collagen yield should not be dated C measurement is the 1% collagen yield threshold.

Considering that collagen contains about 40–45% carbon, 250 mg of bone are necessary to provide enough carbon for a regular-sized graphite target of 1 mg.

For well-preserved bone (20–25% collagen), the sample size decreases to about 10 mg.

The chemical integrity of this biomolecule can be assessed using simple biochemical criteria such as %C, %N and C/N ratio.