Malware and/or hackers could target traffic coming to or leaving a known dating site in order to intercept vital information.The dating site itself could become the target of attack, a breach could lead to the loss of identifying and/or embarrassing information.Online dating site scams become more and more common.

We found that online dating traffic doesn’t go up on Valentine’s Day, but actually peaks several days after.

Based on the data, we determined that Valentine’s Day is largely irrelevant to people actively dating online.

And we’d do well not to ignore the 24% of online daters who are married (yikes!

), or the significant population of daters in the 60-64 age bracket.

Using data from Google Analytics, The Nielsen Company, and Experian Simmons, we examined 2012 web traffic and behavioral data across several leading online dating sites.

Our goal was to determine patterns in online dating around Valentine’s Day, and to see who was doing what with whom online.If you actually do hook up with someone you will eventually give up quite a bit of identifiable information and may even come into close physical contact.With that in mind it is easy to imagine at least a few of the risks inherent to this type of website: there is the chance of losing control of your personal information as well as the chance of personal physical injury, theft or worse.In fact, messaging that only highlights that aspect of the holiday could alienate singles who feel disconnected from romantic sentiments.This doesn’t mean that singles can’t be reached with romantic imagery.Last night, hordes of lonely hearts went online to oversell their love of Wes Anderson, Sriracha and being “down-to-Earth” in an attempt to find love. The Sunday after New Year’s Day is the busiest time of the year for online dating, according to data provided by dating sites Match and Plenty of Fish. Zoosk, another popular dating site, added that the Sunday after New Year’s was also its biggest day for traffic in 2014.