She has heard of cases where the abusive partner may take the partner's password to check up on him or her routinely.Other times, the abuser may violate their partner's privacy by breaking into their e-mail or checking their phone.

In fact, this study showed that boys are more likely to be victims: about 5 percent of boys and 3 percent of girls had a romantic partner upload or share a humiliating photograph online.

Kevin Jennings, assistant deputy secretary of education for the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, says digital dating abuse is becoming a more frequent problem among teens.

In some instances, the victims, usually teenage girls, receive as many as 40 texts a day with negative messages from their partner.

"She is required to keep her cell phone on all day, all night and be receptive," Murray explains.

The study examined 4,400 responses from 11- to 18-year-old students in one school district in the southern U. The study's authors say this is one of the first attempts to quantify how often digital dating abuse is occurring among teens.

"It may be checking her text and pictures to make sure she's not texting with any other boys," explains Sameer Hinduja, co-founder of the Cyberbullying Research Center and associate professor of criminology at Florida Atlantic University.The Family Violence Prevention Fund is working with the Department of Justice to release a series of public service announcements in their "That's Not Cool" campaign, which encourages teens to be more watchful of their digital relationship behavior.Liz Claiborne Inc., a major women's clothing company, is addressing digital dating abuse."Tell somebody they trust and try to get help because you can't go through it yourself," she said.Physicists from the FOM Foundation and the University of Amsterdam have discovered that the ancient Egyptians used a clever trick to make it easier to transport heavy pyramid stones by sledge.The abusive teens may also monitor their partners' behaviors on social media sites such as Facebook and My Space.