In response to the first destruction, on 21 October 2015, Creative Commons started the New Palmyra project, an online repository of three-dimensional models representing the city's monuments; the models were generated from images gathered, and released into the public domain, by the Syrian internet advocate Bassel Khartabil between 20.

About the destruction during the second ISIL occupation, Abdulkarim states “This time, they don’t seem to have damaged Palmyra as badly as we feared.” and states that "approximately 80% of Palmyra’s antiquities are in fairly good condition and 15% of those more heavily damaged also can and will be restored." Consultations with the UNESCO, UN specialized agencies, archaeological associations and museums produced plans to restore Palmyra; the work is postponed until the violence in Syria ends as many international partners fear for the safety of their teams as well as ensuring that the restored artifacts will not be damaged again by further battles.

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The restoration of the statue ad been described as "an important achievement with a symbolic dimension” by Hamed Al Hammami, Director of the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in the Arab States and UNESCO Representative to Lebanon and the Syrian Arab Republic.

The earliest Palmyrene text attesting a Roman presence in the city dates to 18 AD, when the Roman general Germanicus tried to develop a friendly relationship with Parthia; he sent the Palmyrene Alexandros to Mesene, a Parthian vassal kingdom.

‎‎ Tadmur) is an ancient Semitic city in present-day Homs Governorate, Syria.

Archaeological finds date back to the Neolithic period, and the city was first documented in the early second millennium BC.

The city's inhabitants worshiped local Semitic deities, Mesopotamian and Arab gods.

By the third century AD, Palmyra was a prosperous regional center reaching the apex of its power in the 260s, when Palmyrene King Odaenathus defeated Persian Emperor Shapur I.

According to eyewitnesses, on the militants destroyed the Lion of Al-lāt and other statues; this came days after the militants gathered the citizens and promised not to destroy the city's monuments.

Following the March 2017 capture of Palmyra by the Syrian Army, Maamoun Abdulkarim, director of antiquities and museums at the Syrian Ministry of Culture, stated that the damage to ancient monuments may be lesser than earlier believed and preliminary pictures showed almost no further damage than what was already known.

Its destruction by the Timurids in 1400 reduced it to a small village.

Under French Mandatory rule in 1932, the inhabitants were moved into the new village of Tadmur, and the ancient site became available for excavations.

The city became a Roman colonia during the third century, leading to the incorporation of Roman governing institutions, before becoming a monarchy in 260.