There is an unbroken chain of writers discussing the New Testament that goes back to soon after the Gospels were written.

Psalms, for example, was written by a variety of authors and spans at least several generations beginning with David.

Job seems to relate very early events - well before the Davidic kingdom (although it was most probably written down in Solomon's day) - and so is placed with the "wisdom literature" after the books of Samuel and Kings.

The authors must have clear links to the eyewitnesses (or be eyewitnesses) to reduce the possibility of communication mistakes.

We will learn that even in the most pessimistic, but rational, reading of the data, we come to the understanding that the authors of the New Testament are close enough to the events to be able to give an accurate picture of historical events.

For my purposes I will look at the most relevant information from before A. Unfortunately, the questions of New Testament authorship and dating are not cut and dried. There is substantial variation in the writings of the church fathers.

The church fathers did not have the current understanding of history and authorship. To determine New Testament authorship as best we can, we use the earliest of the patristic sources augmented by the internal evidence of the New Testament.

Much will be uncertain; but this we will know; and this is what we need in order to continue our investigation of scripture and Christian history.

Much of the information we have about the authors of the New Testament comes from the church fathers, the leaders of the church in the post-apostolic age.

Also, we must remember that not every tradition gets retold. 347-419 or 420) was a priest and ascetic who moved frequently and wrote on many topics relevant to the church. 354-430) was a convert to Christianity and became bishop of Hippo.