Pros: There is a strange thrill in being able to 'swipe' that acquaintance you've always fancied, asking them for a date (up) or telling them you want to sleep with them (down). Cons: It pulls in every single woman who happens to be your friend on Facebook, even if they haven't joined Down yet (your cowardly come on will be waiting for them if they ever do), making it rather pointless.

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I was completely surprised by the app I liked the most.

Bumble is often described in the press as a "feminist" dating app.

Both men and women swipe, but only women can start the conversation, and they only have 24 hours from the time they match to start chatting before the connection disappears forever.

For people seeking same-sex relationships, the app doesn't exactly work the way it's intended to; either party can send the first message.

The app lets you know when a match is about to expire, presumably so you can rush in and send that person a message before they slip through your fingers and disappear forever.

You can turn off the notifications, though, as I discovered a couple days in.

Dating apps, for their part, have tried combating this in a number of ways.

JSwipe puts a timer on how long you have to start talking to a match. Coffee Meets Bagel gives you and your match an opening question to break the ice. Bumble was co-founded by Whitney Wolfe, the ousted Tinder cofounder.

The most annoying part about dating apps is breaking the ice.